Industrial Hemp CBD VS Female Cannabis CBD Strains

This is a question that is often asked. I find that it’s not an easy answer. All of the large CBD producers use hemp and try to tell you that it is the same as the CBD obtained from cannabis flowers. I do notice that their results from hemp are always lower in percentage of CBD than cannabis extracted CBD. What is lacking from hemp is the other 298 non psychoactive components that make up cannabis. Also I have sampled large firm’s hemp extracted products and they not only usually taste bad, they make me fall asleep. Contrary to our CBD extracted from AC/DC or the other various strains of CBD rich cannabis flowers, when you ingest our oil you are energized for up to fours with clear mental focus… These are my notes and now the two articles. In a nutshell I say Yes it does matter! read ahead.

Confusion amongst the public on how exactly hemp oil differs from cannabidiol, or CBD, oil, has prompted the nonprofit Hemp Industries Association to issue a statement explaining the difference between the oils in order to ensure that consumers — specifically, medical marijuana patients — are not misled about the intended uses.

Hemp is often mistaken for its cannabis cousin, marijuana, even though smoking an entire garbage bag of hemp would not produce an altered state of consciousness, as hemp contains low levels of THC. Confusion between hemp oil and marijuana oil has spiked recently, as states have passed medical marijuana laws that allow for the use of strains of marijuana that are low in THC and high in CBD. Consumers often confuse hemp oil with CBD oil because both are low in THC and contain CBD.

“With hemp research and development pilot programs taking off this spring, and the hemp retail market growing at an incredible rate, it’s crucial that consumers and retailers alike understand the difference between hemp oil and CBD extracts,” Eric Steenstra, executive director of Hemp Industries Association, said in a separate statement.

“Our Hemp Industries Association position regarding this distinction calls on makers of CBD products to brand and market their products truthfully and clearly, so as to not further the confusion surrounding CBD products in the marketplace.”

Though hemp oil does contain low levels of CBD, typically less than 25 parts per million (ppm), CBD extracts “are produced either directly from cannabis flowers that are up to 15 percent CBD (150,000 ppm), or indirectly as a co-product of the flowers and leaves that are mixed in with the stalks during hemp stalk processing for fiber.”

Because of this distinction, the association says, “It is important for American farmers and processors of hemp to understand that most CBD in products mislabeled as ‘hemp oil’ is a product of large-scale hemp stalk and fiber processing facilities in Europe where the fiber is the primary material produced at a large scale.

“CBD is not a product or component of hemp seeds, and labeling to that effect is misleading and motivated by the desire to take advantage of the legal gray area of CBD under federal law.”

Although hemp was once the most important cash crop in the United States — more so than corn and wheat combined — hemp was banned and classified as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. While classification as a Schedule I drug meant hemp could no longer be grown in the U.S., products containing hemp, such as lotions, fabric and food, are legal for purchase in the U.S. and are often found at natural and health food retailers including Whole Foods, Costco and Sprouts grocers.

In 2001, the Drug Enforcement Administration aimed to change that by attempting to ban people and companies from importing and selling food products containing hemp seed and oil. The Hemp Industries Association responded to this block by successfully suing the DEA, arguing that hemp oil is primarily consumed as a nutritional culinary oil and used in body care products — not to get people high — and therefore, should be allowed.

Since hemp can be used to produce thousands of items including paper, clothing, construction materials, automobile parts and foods and can even be used as a biofuel, 39 states have introduced pro-hemp legislation and 22 have actually passed it. The legislation may have started off as symbolic, but earlier this year, in a move supported by hemp legalization advocates, Congress voted to include an amendment in the Farm Bill that would legalize hemp production for research purposes. This hemp article source;http://www.mintpressnews.com/hemp-oil-versus-cbd-oil-whats-the-difference/193962/

This article says, and I agree “Yes it does matter”

It doesn’t get you high, but it’s causing quite a buzz among medical scientists and patients. The past year has seen a surge of interest in cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabis compound with significant therapeutic properties. Numerous commercial start-ups and internet retailers have jumped on the CBD bandwagon, touting CBD derived from industrial hemp as the next big thing, a miracle oil that can shrink tumors, quell seizures, and ease chronic pain—without making people feel “stoned.” But along with a growing awareness of cannabidiol as a potential health aide there has been a proliferation of misconceptions about CBD.

1. “CBD is medical. THC is recreational.” Project CBD receives many inquiries from around the world and oftentimes people say they are seeking “CBD, the medical part” of the plant, “not THC, the recreational part” that gets you high. Actually, THC, “The High Causer,” has awesome therapeutic properties. Scientists at the Scripps Research Center in San Diego reported that THC inhibits an enzyme implicated in the formation of beta-amyloid plaque, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s-related dementia. The federal government recognizes single-molecule THC as an anti-nausea compound and appetite booster, deeming it a Schedule III drug, a category reserved for medicinal substances with little abuse potential. But whole plant marijuana, the only natural source of THC, continues to be classified as a dangerous Schedule I drug with no medical value.

2. “THC is the bad cannabinoid. CBD is the good cannabinoid.” The drug warrior’s strategic retreat: Give ground on CBD while continuing to demonize THC. Diehard marijuana prohibitionists are exploiting the good news about CBD to further stigmatize high-THC cannabis, casting tetrahydrocannabinol as the bad cannabinoid, whereas CBD is framed as the good cannabinoid. Why? Because CBD doesn’t make you high like THC does. Project CBD categorically rejects this moralistic, reefer madness dichotomy in favor of whole plant cannabis therapeutics.

3. “CBD is most effective without THC.” THC and CBD are the power couple of cannabis compounds—they work best together. Scientific studies have established that CBD and THC interact synergistically to enhance each other’s therapeutic effects. British researchers have shown thatCBD potentiates THC’s anti-inflammatory properties in an animal model of colitis. Scientists at the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco determined that a combination of CBD and THC has a more potent anti-tumoral effect than either compound alone when tested on brain cancerand breast cancer cell lines. And extensive clinical research has demonstrated that CBD combined with THC is more beneficial for neuropathic pain than either compound as a single molecule.

4. “Single-molecule pharmaceuticals are superior to ‘crude’ whole plant medicinals.” According to the federal government, specific components of the marijuana plant (THC, CBD) have medical value, but the plant itself does not have medical value. Uncle Sam’s single-molecule blinders reflect a cultural and political bias that privileges Big Pharma products. Single-molecule medicine is the predominant corporate way, the FDA-approved way, but it’s not the only way, and it’s not necessarily the optimal way to benefit from cannabis therapeutics. Cannabis contains several hundred compounds, including various flavonoids, aromatic terpenes, and many minor cannabinoids in addition to THC and CBD. Each of these compounds has specific healing attributes, but when combined they create what scientists refer to as a holistic “entourage effect,” so that the therapeutic impact of the whole plant is greater than the sum of its single-molecule parts. The Food and Drug Administration, however, isn’t in the business of approving plants as medicine.

“CBD is CBD – It doesn’t matter where it comes from.”

Yes it does matter.

5. “Psychoactivity is inherently an adverse side effect.” According to politically correct drug war catechism, the marijuana high is an unwanted side effect. Big Pharma is keen on synthesizing medically active marijuana-like molecules that don’t make people high—although it’s not obvious why mild euphoric feelings are intrinsically negative for a sick person or a healthy person, for that matter. In ancient Greece, the word euphoria meant “having health,” a state of well-being. The euphoric qualities of cannabis, far from being an unwholesome side effect, are deeply implicated in the therapeutic value of the plant. “We should be thinking of cannabis as a medicine first,” said Dr. Tod Mikuriya, “that happens to have some psychoactive properties, as many medicines do, rather than as an intoxicant that happens to have a few therapeutic properties on the side.”

6. “CBD is legal in all 50 states.” Purveyors of imported, CBD-infused hemp oil claim it’s legal to market their wares anywhere in the United States as long as the oil contains less than 0.3 percent THC. Actually, it’s not so simple. Federal law prohibits U.S. farmers from growing hemp as a commercial crop, but the sale of imported, low-THC, industrial hemp products is permitted in the United States as long as these products are derived from the seed or stalk of the plant, not from the leaves and flowers. Here’s the catch: Cannabidiol can’t be pressed or extracted from hempseed. CBD can be extracted from the flower, leaves, and, only to a very minor extent, from the stalk of the hemp plant. Hemp oil start-ups lack credibility when they say their CBD comes from hempseed and stalk. Congress may soon vote to exempt industrial hemp and CBD from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act. Such legislation would not be necessary if CBD derived from foreign-grown hemp was already legal throughout the United States.

7. “’CBD-only’ laws adequately serve the patient population.” Eleven U.S. state legislatures have passed “CBD only” (or, more accurately, “low THC”) laws, and other states are poised to follow suit. Some states restrict the sources of CBD-rich products and specify the diseases for which CBD can be accessed; others do not. Ostensibly these laws allow the use of CBD-infused oil derived from hemp or cannabis that measures less than 0.3 percent THC. But a CBD-rich remedy with little THC doesn’t work for everyone. Parents of epileptic children have found that adding some THC (or THCA, the raw unheated version of THC) helps with seizure control in many instances. For some epileptics, THC-dominant strains are more effective than CBD-rich products. The vast majority of patients are not well served by CBD-only laws. They need access to a broad spectrum of whole plant cannabis remedies, not just the low THC medicine. One size doesn’t fit all with respect to cannabis therapeutics, and neither does one compound or one product or one strain.

8. “CBD is CBD – It doesn’t matter where it comes from.” Yes it does matter. The flower-tops and leaves of some industrial hemp strains may be a viable source of CBD (legal issues notwithstanding), but hemp is by no means an optimal source of cannabidiol. Industrial hemp typically contains far less cannabidiol than CBD-rich cannabis. Huge amounts of industrial hemp are required to extract a small amount of CBD, thereby raising the risk of toxic contaminants because hemp is a “bio-accumulator” that draws heavy metals from the soil. Single-molecule CBD synthesized in a lab or extracted and refined from industrial hemp lacks critical medicinal terpenes and secondary cannabinoids found in cannabis strains. These compounds interact with CBD and THC to enhance their therapeutic benefits.

-Martin A Lee is the director of Project CBD and the author of Smoke Signals: A Social History of..

Many medical cannabis cannabis interest groups, like ParentsForPot, has also gone public warning people about the differences.

Here is their statement:

As respected members of the cannabis community, the undersigned groups and activists support full spectrum cannabis legislation and treatment for children with autism and seizure disorders. We agree that experience and research show proper and effective treatment requires the combination only the full cannabis plant can provide. We also agree that we need to support other organizations and activists who stand with us and concur that medical cannabis, by definition, includes the entire plant and all its chemical compounds.
As more parents learn that cannabis can help their children with autism and seizure disorders, it has become necessary to point out that the upshot of CBD only legislation and companies that produce CBD only products are giving what may be false hope to families who have exhausted other avenues of treatment.
We believe it is vital to understand the importance of using the entire cannabis plant as part of their solution. Parents who are worried that their children are “getting high” need to know that cannabis does not have the same psychoactive effect on the brain of a child with severe epilepsy or autism as it does on the average person. It actually works to slow the neurons that are firing so rapidly down, creating a healthier brain not a “high” brain. It is equally important for parents to know that they can give their children full plant cannabis without getting them “high.” Ingesting whole plant cold extract cannabis delivers non- psychoactive, non-psychotropic effects. This is an essential factor in building up the system that enables THC and CBD to work. It also allows the incorporation of the myriad beneficial components that cannabis provides.
The truth is that many parents who have tried CBD only treatments for their children with autism and epilepsy report no success or reduction in symptoms. They are forced to go to the black market to get the medicine they need. In fact, parents who are using straight THC as a rescue medication for their children’s seizures are seeing great results. Their children are cognitive and coherent instead of high and out of commission for a whole day.
Industrial hemp does not contain the amount of THC or CBD needed to make an effective treatment for epilepsy or autism. Also important to remember is that these CBD producers are unregulated; there is no proof that they are really providing what they promise. That, along with the lack of results are two good reasons to consider other options.
Parents, please feel free to contact the groups listed below to learn more about the differences between full plant and CBD only cannabis treatments to make a more informed decision. Your child’s life depends on it.

This article source; http://cbdcrew.org/8-misconceptions-about-cannabidiol-cbdan-important-document-that-everybody-who-is-passionate-about-medical-cannabis-should-read/

Websites:
www.parents4pot.org
www.uf4a.org
www.epsilonresearch.org
http://www.alternativeherbsls.net/
FB Groups:
Cannabis Oil Success Stories
CBD 4 Children With Epilepsy
Parents 4 Pot Education Group
National Cannabis Patients Wall
Treating Autism With Cannabis
Medical Cannabis: THCA and Alternatives for Success
Medical Cannabis: Whole Plant Therapies
Molecule Madness Education & Research Group

Resources:
http://www.collective-evolution.com/…/inform-yourself-abou…/
http://pediatriccannabistherapy.com/…/treatable-con…/autism/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23585028
http://emeraldwellnesscoop.com/…/introduction-to-the-endoc…/
http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/studies-finds-link-be…/…/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23653228
http://www.scribd.com/…/The-Endocannabinoid-System-as-it-Re…
http://theweek.com/…/speedreads-boy-with-autism-has-his-own…
http://www.medicaljane.com/…/cannabinoid-deficiency-may-ex…/#
http://www.inquisitr.com/…/marijuana-affects-autism-but-no…/
http://uf4a.org
https://cannacom.ca/index.php/cannabis-research
http://cannabisforautism.wordpress.com
http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/families-use-medical-…/…/

Medical Cannabis Treats Autism

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/…/121121145402.htm
http://www.letfreedomgrow.com/cmu/SamsStory.htm
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tag/marijuana-autism/
http://www.truthonpot.com/2013/07/01/medical-ma…
http://www.hightimes.com/…/marijuana-may-be-used-treat-auti…

 

Our website provides our patients with information on our various strains and educates each individual with current medical marijuana facts and laws.

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